• 6 - Accounting for Highly Liquid Investments Known as Trading Securities

    An overview of accounting for highly liquid investments known as trading securities, to accompany http://www.principlesofaccounting.com Chapter 6, Cash and Highly Liquid Investments *Check out the Classroom page to find out how to take this course for credit: http://www.principlesofaccounting.com/classroom.html

    published: 21 May 2010
  • Money Market Yields, Lecture 019, Securities Investment 101, Video 00022

    The money markets are concerned with very liquid securities investment products based upon cash-flows, with usually less than one year to maturity and without associated coupons. Typical investment products include government treasury bills, certificates of deposit, commercial paper, and short-term zero-coupon bonds. Although investment yields are often lower than long-term bonds and other equity-based investments, the high liquidity in the money markets means you can get in and out of your positions relatively quickly and easily. Therefore the money markets attract large investors such as insurance companies who may need to turn investments into cash at very short notice. The key yield curve in the money markets is the Inter-Bank Offer Rate (such as LIBOR), which itself is closely rel...

    published: 04 Jul 2013
  • Benefits of investing in Equity, Debt and Liquid Instruments

    Comprehend the benefits of investing in Equity, debt & liquid instrument outlined in this informative video, that is part of the Investor Education Series. Catch more such interesting investor education videos on http://indiainvestkaro.com/investorEducation. For more information visit http://www.utimf.com/

    published: 14 Jun 2013
  • Inside a Google data center

    Joe Kava, VP of Google's Data Center Operations, gives a tour inside a Google data center, and shares details about the security, sustainability and the core architecture of Google's infrastructure.

    published: 17 Dec 2014
  • Liquid tradable securities Top # 19 Facts

    Liquid tradable securities Top # 19 Facts

    published: 28 Oct 2015
  • The difference between a liquid and illiquid stock or security.

    In this short video, I will talk about the difference between a liquid and illiquid stock. Visit http://www.twitter.com/EverydayTrades for more free stock market tips and advice.

    published: 15 Nov 2015
  • Liquid tradable securities Top #20 Facts

    published: 29 Jan 2016
  • What is a Market Maker?

    Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Market Maker” A broker-dealer who is prepared to buy or sell a specific security — such as a bond or at least one round lot of a stock — at a publicly quoted price, is called a market maker in that security. Other brokers buy or sell specific securities through market makers, who may maintain inventories of those securities. There is often more than one market maker in a particular security, and they bid against each other, helping to keep the marketplace liquid. The Stock Market and the corporate and municipal bond markets are market maker markets. In contrast, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange there's a single specialist to handle transactions in each security. Mark...

    published: 27 May 2016
  • Advanced Liquid Propane Autogas Technology

    Steve Rayborn of Alkane Truck Company talks about the improvements in liquid propane autogas technology. LPG is the 3rd most widely used alternative fuel in the world and advancements in direct-injection technology has made it the natural gas fuel of choice. One reason is when the fuel enters the combustion chamber as a liquid it is -50° Fahrenheit. This provides a cooler burn, higher octane, more horsepower and the elimination of cold start problems and icing of fuel at extreme cold temperatures. NO MONEY OR OTHER CONSIDERATION IS BEING SOLICITED, AND IF SENT IN RESPONSE, WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. NO OFFER TO BUY THE SECURITIES CAN BE ACCEPTED AND NO PART OF THE PURCHASE PRICE CAN BE RECEIVED UNTIL THE OFFERING STATEMENT FILED BY THE COMPANY WITH THE SEC HAS BEEN QUALFIED BY THE SEC. ANY SUC...

    published: 27 Mar 2014
  • What is Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR)?

    Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Statutory Liquidity Ratio” Statutory Liquidity Ratio is the amount of liquid assets such as precious metals or other approved securities, which a financial institution must maintain as reserves other than the cash. SLR is used to limit the expansion of bank credit, for ensuring the solvency of banks even if all the loans by the bank go bad, the bank can still retrieve a part of it by selling the gold or govt securities. The main objectives for maintaining the SLR ratio are the following: To control the expansion of bank credit. To ensure the solvency of commercial banks. To compel the commercial banks to invest in government securities like government bonds. If any bank fails ...

    published: 04 Nov 2015
  • The Woodford funds compared

    At Woodford, we’re keen that investors understand their investments and how they are managed. We want to ensure the right people invest in the right funds for the right reasons, making informed investment decisions based on what’s right for them. We offer three funds – all managed by Neil Woodford. The purpose of this film is to explain the key differences between the funds and help you decide whether any of them are suitable for you. Find out more: https://woodfordfunds.com/funds/ What are the risks? – The value of investments and any income from them may go down as well as up, so you may get back less than you invested – Past performance cannot be relied upon as a guide to future performance – The annual management charge applicable to the funds is charged to capital, so the income o...

    published: 05 Apr 2017
  • What is Liquidity?

    Liquidity can be used to refer to two different areas: liquid market and liquid asset. A liquid market is a situation in which investors in the market are willing to trade securities at every price level. Also these types of markets are usually known to have high levels of trading and are safer to participate in. On the other hand, a liquid asset is an asset that can be easily converted to cash. Liquidity is the degree to which an asset or security can be bought or sold in the market without affecting the asset's price. Liquidity is characterized by a high level of trading activity. Assets that can be easily bought or sold are known as liquid assets. The ability to convert an asset to cash quickly is also known as "marketability." There is no specific liquidity formula; however, liquidit...

    published: 16 Jul 2014
  • 2016 FMC/Policy Session 4: Unconventional wisdom

    A potentially important channel for unconventional monetary policy is through its withdrawal of safe, liquid securities from private investors. This can temporarily decrease liquidity in some markets, not only for the withdrawn securities but also for markets that rely on those securities for collateral. Conversely, unconventional policy can also have the intended effect of temporarily increasing liquidity in other less safe and historically less liquid markets. How much has unconventional policy affected market liquidity? How much will policy normalization affect financial markets?

    published: 06 Jun 2016
  • Neil Woodford on recent portfolio activity

    It’s been a busier than usual few weeks here in terms of strategy evolution. Neil has been keen to take advantage of what he sees as a compelling, contrarian opportunity in domestic stocks, which have become too cheap to ignore in the wake of the Brexit vote last year. In this video, he explains the background to this activity with more details of what’s been bought and sold for in the fund roundup here: https://woodfordfunds.com/words/insights/april-2017/ What are the risks? - The value of the fund and any income from it may go down as well as up, so you may get back less than you invested - Past performance cannot be relied upon as a guide to future performance - The annual management charge is charged to capital, so the income of the fund may be higher but capital growth may be restri...

    published: 15 May 2017
  • Classification of Debt Mutual Funds Based on Time Horizon | Type of Debt Mutual Funds

    There are different types of Debt Mutual Funds that invest in various fixed income securities of different time horizons – Liquid, Ultra Short Term, Short Term, Medium Term and Long term. What are the differences between all? Which one you should choose? Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/yadnyaacademy/?fref=ts Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://mobile.twitter.com/investyadnya

    published: 29 Mar 2016
  • Statuory Liquid Ratio (SLR) - Funding GAP

    @ Members :: Treasury Consulting LLP Pleased to Present Video titled - " Statuory Liquid Ratio (SLR) - Funding GAP ". Video would be covering all aspects of SLR , Investments Accounting like Held Till Maturity (HTM) , Available for Sale (AFS) , Held for Trading (HFT) , Gains/(Losses) on Account of SLR Securities , Funding GAP created by SLR Securities in Books of Banks. You are most welcome to connect with us at 91-9899242978 (Handheld) , Skype ~ Rahul5327 , Twitter @ Rahulmagan8 , Rahul.magan@treasuryconsulting.in Info@treasuryconsulting.in or visit our website - www.treasuryconsulting.in

    published: 13 Feb 2017
6 - Accounting for Highly Liquid Investments Known as Trading Securities

6 - Accounting for Highly Liquid Investments Known as Trading Securities

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:25
  • Updated: 21 May 2010
  • views: 8550
videos
An overview of accounting for highly liquid investments known as trading securities, to accompany http://www.principlesofaccounting.com Chapter 6, Cash and Highly Liquid Investments *Check out the Classroom page to find out how to take this course for credit: http://www.principlesofaccounting.com/classroom.html
https://wn.com/6_Accounting_For_Highly_Liquid_Investments_Known_As_Trading_Securities
Money Market Yields, Lecture 019, Securities Investment 101, Video 00022

Money Market Yields, Lecture 019, Securities Investment 101, Video 00022

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:20
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2013
  • views: 4109
videos
The money markets are concerned with very liquid securities investment products based upon cash-flows, with usually less than one year to maturity and without associated coupons. Typical investment products include government treasury bills, certificates of deposit, commercial paper, and short-term zero-coupon bonds. Although investment yields are often lower than long-term bonds and other equity-based investments, the high liquidity in the money markets means you can get in and out of your positions relatively quickly and easily. Therefore the money markets attract large investors such as insurance companies who may need to turn investments into cash at very short notice. The key yield curve in the money markets is the Inter-Bank Offer Rate (such as LIBOR), which itself is closely related to the market riskless rate. Many corporate products (such as commercial paper) have yields based upon a 'spread' to floating Inter-Bank Offer Rates (i.e. they offer higher yields than bank-to-bank loans and treasury bills). There are also four other key yield measures employed in the money markets. These are the Bank Discount Yield, the Holding Period Yield, the (simple) Money Market Yield, and the Effective (compounded) Annual Yield. This lecture discusses all four, how they are used, how they are related, and how they offer different kinds of short-term investment information. Previous lecture: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAbD-T2GfnE Next lecture: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGiluWlcaqI For financial education from London to Singapore and beyond, please contact MithrilMoney via the following website: http://mithrilmoney.com/ This MithrilMoney lecture was delivered by Andy Duncan, CQF. Please read our disclaimer: http://mithrilmoney.com/disclaimer/
https://wn.com/Money_Market_Yields,_Lecture_019,_Securities_Investment_101,_Video_00022
Benefits of investing in Equity, Debt and Liquid Instruments

Benefits of investing in Equity, Debt and Liquid Instruments

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:27
  • Updated: 14 Jun 2013
  • views: 13115
videos
Comprehend the benefits of investing in Equity, debt & liquid instrument outlined in this informative video, that is part of the Investor Education Series. Catch more such interesting investor education videos on http://indiainvestkaro.com/investorEducation. For more information visit http://www.utimf.com/
https://wn.com/Benefits_Of_Investing_In_Equity,_Debt_And_Liquid_Instruments
Inside a Google data center

Inside a Google data center

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:28
  • Updated: 17 Dec 2014
  • views: 3817261
videos
Joe Kava, VP of Google's Data Center Operations, gives a tour inside a Google data center, and shares details about the security, sustainability and the core architecture of Google's infrastructure.
https://wn.com/Inside_A_Google_Data_Center
Liquid tradable securities Top # 19 Facts

Liquid tradable securities Top # 19 Facts

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 28 Oct 2015
  • views: 6
videos https://wn.com/Liquid_Tradable_Securities_Top_19_Facts
The difference between a liquid and illiquid stock or security.

The difference between a liquid and illiquid stock or security.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:47
  • Updated: 15 Nov 2015
  • views: 168
videos
In this short video, I will talk about the difference between a liquid and illiquid stock. Visit http://www.twitter.com/EverydayTrades for more free stock market tips and advice.
https://wn.com/The_Difference_Between_A_Liquid_And_Illiquid_Stock_Or_Security.
Liquid tradable securities Top  #20 Facts

Liquid tradable securities Top #20 Facts

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:22
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2016
  • views: 2
videos
https://wn.com/Liquid_Tradable_Securities_Top_20_Facts
What is a Market Maker?

What is a Market Maker?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:58
  • Updated: 27 May 2016
  • views: 518
videos
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Market Maker” A broker-dealer who is prepared to buy or sell a specific security — such as a bond or at least one round lot of a stock — at a publicly quoted price, is called a market maker in that security. Other brokers buy or sell specific securities through market makers, who may maintain inventories of those securities. There is often more than one market maker in a particular security, and they bid against each other, helping to keep the marketplace liquid. The Stock Market and the corporate and municipal bond markets are market maker markets. In contrast, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange there's a single specialist to handle transactions in each security. Market Makers must be compensated for the risk they take; what if he buys your shares in IBM then IBM's stock price begins to fall before a willing buyer has purchased the shares? To prevent this, the market maker maintains a spread on each stock he covers. The market maker may purchase your shares of IBM from you for $100 each the ask price and then offer to sell them to a buyer at $100.05 the bid price. The difference between the ask and bid price is only $.05, but by trading millions of shares a day, he's managed to pocket a significant chunk of change to offset his risk. In contrast to conventional brokers, marker makers assume a high level of risk because of the high number of units they hold their inventory. Market makers are entrusted with promoting market efficiency by keeping markets liquid. To ensure impartiality for the benefit of their clients, brokerage houses who act as market makers are legally required to separate their market making activities from their brokerage sales operations. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
https://wn.com/What_Is_A_Market_Maker
Advanced Liquid Propane Autogas Technology

Advanced Liquid Propane Autogas Technology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:47
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2014
  • views: 3243
videos
Steve Rayborn of Alkane Truck Company talks about the improvements in liquid propane autogas technology. LPG is the 3rd most widely used alternative fuel in the world and advancements in direct-injection technology has made it the natural gas fuel of choice. One reason is when the fuel enters the combustion chamber as a liquid it is -50° Fahrenheit. This provides a cooler burn, higher octane, more horsepower and the elimination of cold start problems and icing of fuel at extreme cold temperatures. NO MONEY OR OTHER CONSIDERATION IS BEING SOLICITED, AND IF SENT IN RESPONSE, WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. NO OFFER TO BUY THE SECURITIES CAN BE ACCEPTED AND NO PART OF THE PURCHASE PRICE CAN BE RECEIVED UNTIL THE OFFERING STATEMENT FILED BY THE COMPANY WITH THE SEC HAS BEEN QUALFIED BY THE SEC. ANY SUCH OFFER MAY BE WITHDRAWN OR REVOKED, WITHOUT OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND, AT ANY TIME BEFORE NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE GIVEN AFTER THE DATE OF QUALIFICATION. AN INDICATION OF INTEREST INVOLVES NO OBLIGATION OR COMMITMENT OF ANY KIND. CERTAIN STATEMENTS WITHIN THIS VIDEO MAY CONTAIN FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THE COMPANY, ITS BUSINESS PLAN AND STRATEGY, AND ITS INDUSTRY. THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE BASED ON THE BELIEFS OF, ASSUMPTIONS MADE BY, AND INFORMATION CURRENTLY AVAILABLE TO THE COMPANY’S MANAGEMENT. WHEN USED IN THE OFFERING MATERIALS, THE WORDS “ESTIMATE,” “PROJECT,” “BELIEVE,” “ANTICIPATE,” “INTEND,” “EXPECT” AND SIMILAR EXPRESSIONS ARE INTENDED TO IDENTIFY FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH CONSTITUTE FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE STATEMENTS REFLECT MANAGEMENT’S CURRENT VIEWS WITH RESPECT TO FUTURE EVENTS AND ARE SUBJECT TO RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES THAT COULD CAUSE THE COMPANY’S ACTUAL RESULTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE CONTAINED IN THE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. INVESTORS ARE CAUTIONED NOT TO PLACE UNDUE RELIANCE ON THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS, WHICH SPEAK ONLY AS OF THE DATE ON WHICH THEY ARE MADE. THE COMPANY DOES NOT UNDERTAKE ANY OBLIGATION TO REVISE OR UPDATE THESE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS TO REFLECT EVENTS OR CIRCUMSTANCES AFTER SUCH DATE OR TO REFLECT THE OCCURRENCE OF UNANTICIPATED EVENTS.
https://wn.com/Advanced_Liquid_Propane_Autogas_Technology
What is Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR)?

What is Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR)?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:27
  • Updated: 04 Nov 2015
  • views: 1273
videos
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Statutory Liquidity Ratio” Statutory Liquidity Ratio is the amount of liquid assets such as precious metals or other approved securities, which a financial institution must maintain as reserves other than the cash. SLR is used to limit the expansion of bank credit, for ensuring the solvency of banks even if all the loans by the bank go bad, the bank can still retrieve a part of it by selling the gold or govt securities. The main objectives for maintaining the SLR ratio are the following: To control the expansion of bank credit. To ensure the solvency of commercial banks. To compel the commercial banks to invest in government securities like government bonds. If any bank fails to maintain the required level of Statutory Liquidity Ratio, then it becomes liable to pay penalty. The central bank can increase the SLR to control inflation, suck liquidity in the market, to tighten the measure to safeguard the customer’s money. In a growing economy banks would like to invest in stock market, not in government securities or gold as the latter would yield less returns. One more reason is long term government securities or any bond) are sensitive to interest rate changes. But in an emerging economy interest rate change is a common activity. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
https://wn.com/What_Is_Statutory_Liquidity_Ratio_(Slr)
The Woodford funds compared

The Woodford funds compared

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:22
  • Updated: 05 Apr 2017
  • views: 47
videos
At Woodford, we’re keen that investors understand their investments and how they are managed. We want to ensure the right people invest in the right funds for the right reasons, making informed investment decisions based on what’s right for them. We offer three funds – all managed by Neil Woodford. The purpose of this film is to explain the key differences between the funds and help you decide whether any of them are suitable for you. Find out more: https://woodfordfunds.com/funds/ What are the risks? – The value of investments and any income from them may go down as well as up, so you may get back less than you invested – Past performance cannot be relied upon as a guide to future performance – The annual management charge applicable to the funds is charged to capital, so the income of the funds may be higher but capital growth may be restricted or capital may be eroded – The funds may invest in other transferable securities, money market instruments, warrants, collective investment schemes and deposits – The funds may invest in overseas securities and be exposed to currencies other than pound sterling. – The CF Woodford Income Focus Fund will be invested in a concentrated portfolio of securities – the fund is not restricted by reference to any geographical region, sector or market capitalisation – The CF Woodford Equity Income Fund may invest in unquoted securities, which may be less liquid and more difficult to realise than publicly traded securities Important information Before investing, you should read the Key Investor Information Document (KIID) for the fund, and the Prospectus which, along with our terms and conditions, can be obtained from the downloads page or from our registered office. If you have a financial adviser, you should seek their advice before investing. Woodford Investment Management Ltd is not authorised to provide investment advice. You should note that capital is at risk with these investments and you may get back less than you invested. The value of the fund or trust as well as any income paid will fluctuate which may partly be the result of exchange rate changes. The price of shares in the Woodford Patient Capital Trust is determined by market supply and demand, and this may be different to the net asset value of the trust. The Woodford Patient Capital Trust currently intends to conduct its affairs so that its securities can be recommended by IFAs to ordinary retail investors in accordance with the FCA’s rules in relation to non-mainstream investment products and intends to continue to do so for the foreseeable future. The securities are excluded from the FCA’s restrictions which apply to non-mainstream investment products because they are shares in an investment trust. Young businesses have a different risk profile to mature blue-chip companies – risks are much more stock-specific, which implies a lower correlation with equity markets and the wider economy. Long-term outcomes are more binary – extremely attractive rewards for success but some businesses will inevitably fail to fulfil their potential and this may expose Woodford Patient Capital Trust investors to the risk of capital losses. As it can take years for young businesses to fulfil their potential, this investment requires patience.
https://wn.com/The_Woodford_Funds_Compared
What is Liquidity?

What is Liquidity?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:06
  • Updated: 16 Jul 2014
  • views: 650
videos
Liquidity can be used to refer to two different areas: liquid market and liquid asset. A liquid market is a situation in which investors in the market are willing to trade securities at every price level. Also these types of markets are usually known to have high levels of trading and are safer to participate in. On the other hand, a liquid asset is an asset that can be easily converted to cash. Liquidity is the degree to which an asset or security can be bought or sold in the market without affecting the asset's price. Liquidity is characterized by a high level of trading activity. Assets that can be easily bought or sold are known as liquid assets. The ability to convert an asset to cash quickly is also known as "marketability." There is no specific liquidity formula; however, liquidity is often calculated by using liquidity ratios. It is safer to invest in liquid assets than illiquid ones because it is easier for an investor to get his/her money out of the investment. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Liquidity
2016 FMC/Policy Session 4: Unconventional wisdom

2016 FMC/Policy Session 4: Unconventional wisdom

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:27:33
  • Updated: 06 Jun 2016
  • views: 56
videos
A potentially important channel for unconventional monetary policy is through its withdrawal of safe, liquid securities from private investors. This can temporarily decrease liquidity in some markets, not only for the withdrawn securities but also for markets that rely on those securities for collateral. Conversely, unconventional policy can also have the intended effect of temporarily increasing liquidity in other less safe and historically less liquid markets. How much has unconventional policy affected market liquidity? How much will policy normalization affect financial markets?
https://wn.com/2016_Fmc_Policy_Session_4_Unconventional_Wisdom
Neil Woodford on recent portfolio activity

Neil Woodford on recent portfolio activity

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:12
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 149
videos
It’s been a busier than usual few weeks here in terms of strategy evolution. Neil has been keen to take advantage of what he sees as a compelling, contrarian opportunity in domestic stocks, which have become too cheap to ignore in the wake of the Brexit vote last year. In this video, he explains the background to this activity with more details of what’s been bought and sold for in the fund roundup here: https://woodfordfunds.com/words/insights/april-2017/ What are the risks? - The value of the fund and any income from it may go down as well as up, so you may get back less than you invested - Past performance cannot be relied upon as a guide to future performance - The annual management charge is charged to capital, so the income of the fund may be higher but capital growth may be restricted or capital may be eroded - The fund may invest in other transferable securities, money market instruments, warrants, collective investment schemes and deposits - The fund may invest in overseas securities and be exposed to currencies other than pound sterling - The fund may invest in unquoted securities, which may be less liquid and more difficult to realise than publicly traded securities Important Information: Before investing, you should read the Key Investor Information Document (KIID) for the fund, and the Prospectus which, along with our terms and conditions, can be obtained from the downloads page or from our registered office. If you have a financial adviser, you should seek their advice before investing. Woodford Investment Management Ltd is not authorised to provide investment advice.
https://wn.com/Neil_Woodford_On_Recent_Portfolio_Activity
Classification of Debt Mutual Funds Based on Time Horizon | Type of Debt Mutual Funds

Classification of Debt Mutual Funds Based on Time Horizon | Type of Debt Mutual Funds

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:43
  • Updated: 29 Mar 2016
  • views: 1547
videos
There are different types of Debt Mutual Funds that invest in various fixed income securities of different time horizons – Liquid, Ultra Short Term, Short Term, Medium Term and Long term. What are the differences between all? Which one you should choose? Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/yadnyaacademy/?fref=ts Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://mobile.twitter.com/investyadnya
https://wn.com/Classification_Of_Debt_Mutual_Funds_Based_On_Time_Horizon_|_Type_Of_Debt_Mutual_Funds
Statuory Liquid Ratio (SLR) - Funding GAP

Statuory Liquid Ratio (SLR) - Funding GAP

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:10
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2017
  • views: 362
videos
@ Members :: Treasury Consulting LLP Pleased to Present Video titled - " Statuory Liquid Ratio (SLR) - Funding GAP ". Video would be covering all aspects of SLR , Investments Accounting like Held Till Maturity (HTM) , Available for Sale (AFS) , Held for Trading (HFT) , Gains/(Losses) on Account of SLR Securities , Funding GAP created by SLR Securities in Books of Banks. You are most welcome to connect with us at 91-9899242978 (Handheld) , Skype ~ Rahul5327 , Twitter @ Rahulmagan8 , Rahul.magan@treasuryconsulting.in Info@treasuryconsulting.in or visit our website - www.treasuryconsulting.in
https://wn.com/Statuory_Liquid_Ratio_(Slr)_Funding_Gap
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